Fun content that grasps the thought of the reader is more likely to be seen and encouraged to like, comment, shared, and followed

Keywords: blog , graphic-design , seo , typography , visual-blogging , writing

The homepage must reflect your content as a whole. It is irritating and annoying to see POP-UP messages blocking the website. Most people click them away and never return again.

https://dropnerblog.com/2020/09/16/whats-your-blog-about-and-is-it-bright-for-the-reader-5-ways-to-know-it

Use your personal information wisely to make a connection

In case you wondered, engaging with clients to create their About Us pages is one of my favorite projects. I love storytelling and I’m driven to gather information from people and help them connect with their potential clients. I’m happy to help you tell your story about you.

https://uncommoncontentllc.com/2020/06/13/no-really-its-all-about-you

Always remember who your website is for (that would be readers, in case you forgot)

Keywords: Blog, Marketing

There’s a lot more you can do with your author website, but I’ll leave you with one challenge. You may remember that in the first post, when we talked about the why of an author website, I explained that my goal is to make readers know their way to my website in case I ever lose my social media. But to draw readers to a site consistently, you have to offer something to keep drawing them in. You have to offer something special.

http://www.hashtagiwrotethis.com/blog/essential-elements-of-an-author-website

How to write an About page

Here are some things you might want to consider:

  • Position yourself as an authority in your field – let people know why they should step over your competitors in a mad scramble to secure your services. Is it your years of experience that make you an expert? Perhaps it’s the consultation work you do or the speaking engagements you attend? Maybe you write a wickedly popular blog that people come to for industry insights? Let people know why you’re the top dog.
  • What’s your story? – Tell me about the journey you’ve been on. Even better, tell me about your struggle, how you arrived where you are, and what it cost you to become successful. We all like a good yarn, especially one that encompasses twists and turns before the protagonist finds their happy ending.
  • If you’re a a freelancer, a lone wolf, what makes you tick? How are you different from the other freelance translators or designers or writers that pop up on Google? Why did you choose to strike out alone? What value can bring to someone’s business that they can’t add for themselves?
  • If this is a business page, what makes your team special? What’s the glue that holds them together? Why these people doing this thing? What made you hire them? Why do they stick around?
  • What are your values? What can customers expect you to deliver with consistency? Why do these things matter to you? Why should they matter to your customers?
  • Build trust. Potential clients are looking for signs that you’re trustworthy and will deliver on the claims you make. Mention your qualifications and the awards you’ve won. Tell prospects about your speaking engagements, placing you as a sought-after expert. Done some charitable work? You’re practically Mother Theresa, but if nobody knows, nobody cares.
  • Some backstory is good, but nobody wants the blow-by-blow of your life. Keep it relevant, keep it brief and keep it interesting.
  • Emotion is okay. Your homepage and service page should be business like, but there’s a little more room to tug on the heart strings here. Try using more emotive word choices than normal on your About page, swapping ‘assist’ for ‘help’ and ‘give’ with ‘donate.’ This list has some great ideas for replacing intellectual language with emotional words.
  • For the love of god, keep it brief. As with all web pages, the average reader will focus their attention on your copy for no longer than eight seconds. Keep the most relevant and useful information above the page fold, below this, your reader will only take in 20% of what you have to say (rather than the 80% afforded to above the fold.)
  • Hold the hard sell. Your About page is a place to warm up your potential customers, not to force your product or service down their throats. Keep it conversational and light, a chance to chat about your business with an interested party – no pressure, no expectation. By all means blow your own trumpet, but do it gently and in your customers direction, rather than up in the air.
  • Include a call to action, but rather than asking for a sale, suggest your reader signs up for a newsletter so that they can benefit from your expertise on a regular basis or checks out your blog for some helpful and relevant advice. Offer them something for nothing, rather than asking them for a commitment at this stage.

https://rowanmartincopywriting.com/2019/03/20/how-to-write-an-about-me-webpage-that-makes-a-connection/

How Content Writing and Programming Are Similar and Why I Do Both

content writing , freelance , programming , web developer , writer

Web Musings

You stare at a blank page and you have to fill this blank page with words.  The page can be for a blog post or it can be for a website.  On this page, I have to create something valuable.

Content writing and programming are very similar in that you have to make something out of thin air that will encourage someone to act, whether it’s through obtaining something that resonates with them on a deep level or they just want to be entertained or learn something new.  These two aspects of allowing a customer to do something is why I do what I do.

Here are two examples:

A visitor to a website enters the website not knowing what to do and through great user experience and coding, they intuitively know what to do.  Whether it’s to sign up then log in become a member of a website that…

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